Field trials

The biochar being applied to the field prior to incorporation and seeding.

Diacarbon and BC Hydro are conducting a field trial examining the effect of biochar on barley growth. They are measuring growth, soil temperature, and nutrient levels.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) authorized this first of its kind testing in BC following Diacarbon’s lab results that showed that biochar improves water retention, root development, and fresh yields of barley using soils from the Peace River Region.

This field test covers 1200 square meters of the Peace River Region in seven randomized blocks with four biochar rates and a control. This test will not be irrigated.

For further information: http://www.diacarbon.com/diacarbon-establishes-bcs-first-biochar-field-t...

Project Contacts
Diacarbon Energy Inc.
Alka Mandher
Corporate Communications and Marketing Manager
T: 604.291.0001
E: alka@diacarbon.com

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The Soil Fertility Project is an interesting project that attempts to use biochar to address soil fertility and climate change both in Wales in weed eradication projects.

In the Indian project ( http://www.soilfertilityproject.com/Soil_Fertility/Indian_Project.html). The participants started by using the Anila stove to product biochar, but found that it was unworkable. Now they are using a digestor to process wet waste, get some energy, and use the slurry for fertilizer. They are also using a small BiG Char unit to process green waste into biochar.

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http://www.lrrd.org/public-lrrd/proofs/lrrd2411/leng24199.htm

In their study in Honduras, the authors carefully mixed rice hull char (made in a TLUD stove) with cassava chips and foliage and fed that to cattle, while doing a careful control, and measuring the health of the cattle as well as their methane emissions. The results are encouraging.

Twelve local “Yellow” cattle with initial live weight ranging from 80 to 100 kg were assigned in a completely randomized block design to a 2*2 factorial arrangement of four treatments with three replications. The factors were: biochar at 0.6% of diet DM or none; and potassium nitrate at 6% of diet DM or urea at 1.83% of diet DM. The basal diet was cassava root chips fed ad libitum and fresh cassava foliage at 1% of LW (DM basis). Sodium sulphate and sodium chloride were added to the diet at the rate of 0.4% and 0.5% in the DM. The trial lasted 98 days following a 21 day adaptation to the diets.

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Paal Wendelobo, from Africa, November, 2011

A common Miombo forest in Africa will give about 3 ton wood per ha a year. 3 ton of dry wood will give 800 kg of charcoal. A household of 5 consume 2-3 kg charcoal a day or about 800 kg a year. To produce 3 kg of charcoal you need 10-12 kg of dry fire wood in a common kiln. That will give one day cooking on a charcoal stove, and almost no biochar. 10-12kg dry chopped wood will give 3 days of cooking on a TLUD-ND or another FES and 2.5 kg of biochar

Energy forestry using just the sprouting every year can give up to 10 ton wood per ha a year, easy to cut to appropriate fuel for TLUD-ND’s or other types of FES. By adding some biochar to soil of bad quality 20-30 % increased yields can be obtained, which will give more food, more household energy, more jobs, better economy, better health for women and children and saving the forest. It can probably be as simple as this and is that not some of what we are looking for and need?

We know some changes have to take place on the household energy sector and we have to start somewhere. Why not start with small scale farmers on sandy soil, and from there develop the new household bio-energy strategy for developing countries. Probably also with the charcoal business, they have the whole infrastructure intact and can easy change from charcoal to alternative biomass like chopped wood or pellets from agriculture and forestry related waste.

For more information about this cooking stoves project see:
http://www.bioenergylists.org/en/content/zambia-peko-pe

Arborists in Chicago are studying the results of biochar on trees growing in urban soils that are typically hostile to trees. This research is part of a larger urban-soils study that includes applications of biochar in greenhouse and field plot settings at The Morton Arboretum. The Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories have also been testing adding biochar to the soil mix when planting trees. More information and media coverage of this study about biochar and urban tree care can be found on the Bartlett Tree Experts web site.

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Biochar Industries in Kunghur NSW Australia was the setting for this momentous occasion. Monday 16th of May 2011.

With an even bigger surprise to come this statement by an Australian Biochar Expert.

“This is the first Adam Retort in Australia and it will be the first commercial Adam retort in the western world” Said Dr Paul Taylor PhD Author and Editor of the Book The Biochar Revolution. This statement had Charmaster Dolph Cooke falling off his chair.

Read the whole story on www.biocharproject.org.

Story by Charmaster Dolph Cooke

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Biochar Interest Group, South East Asia, Dr Elmer V Sayre
January, 2011

Dr Elmer V Sayre has been working with the Ecosan project (http://scienceforhumanity.ning.com/group/ecosan ) to use Biochar blended with other organic material and Human Waste to produce fertile soil. More information can be found on their site:
http://sea-biochar.blogspot.com/2011/01/terra-preta-sanitation-project-in.html

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http://www.slideshare.net/saibhaskar/biocharculture-in-cotton-saibhaskar

BIOCHARCULTURE IN COTTON
Good Stoves and Biochar Communities (GSBC) Project - Supported by GoodPlanet.org, France, implemented by GEO http://e-geo.org

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Biochar Production and Uses is the presentation to discover the uses of Biochar as soil amendment and other uses.

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Josiah Hunt, Landscape Ecology July, 2010


Biochar Trials

In 2009 Landscape Ecology was awarded a grant to produce biochar amended compost and observe plant growth responses.

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