Field trials

Growth Promotion of Tea Trees by Putting Bamboo Charcoal in Soil
Takehiko Hoshi, Department of Biological Science and Technology, School of High-Technology for human Welfare, Tokai University, Shizuoka, Japan 2001

Summary

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Improving soils with biochar: General considerations and current research efforts
Julie Major, Seminar Presentation, Cornell University, February 22, 2006

9.2 MB Power point presentation, Reduced pdf file (1 MB) attached.

Indonesia: Survey on the Effect of Charcoal to Tree Growth and Charcoal Production in West Kalimantan (1.3 mb pdf)
Carbon Fixing Forest Management project
Demonstration Study on Carbon Fixing Forest Management in Indonesia
Cooperation Project between Forestry Research and Development Agency (FORDA), Ministry of Forestry, Indonesia, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
Collaboration with Yayasan Dian Tama December 2005

FOREWORD

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Learning to use wood charcoal in farming at a Northwestern Washington native plant nursery.
Richard Haard, Fourth Corner Nurseries, Washington, Febuary 20, 2007
My motivation for preparing this post is to be able to use this motivate discussion of charcoal as a soil additive. Trying to do this work at a very busy nursery that is perhaps pushing their production factor too high (over 80%) is rather frustrating as experiments have gotten over ruled by planning changes, wiped out by harvest before I can read the data and the conditions set up for the experiment just do not work. However, I have been encouraged however and I am now using hardwood charcoal as a carrier for natural inocculum as a matter of routine.
Fourth Corner Nurseries is a wholesale supplier of native plant species, located on 77 acres in the coastal lowlands of northwestern Washington, USA. With approximately 40 acres under cultivation, we produce two/three million direct-seeded, field-grown, bare-root native plants annually. Our principal crop is individually seed-sourced, bare-root deciduous trees and shrubs, herbaceous perennials, grasses and emergent species such as sedges, cattails and rushes for environmental restoration purposes. Our mission is to sustainably grow plants while supporting workers and their families who depend on the farm for their economic subsistence. Use of surplus biomass from our willow coppice field and other materials is our alternative energy vision.
Aerial view of our farm

Aerial View of Fourth Corner Nurseries

Aerial View of Fourth Corner Nurseries
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Richard Haard: Affinity of fungi and crop plant roots to charcoal
Richard Haard, February 12, 2007

The image below illustrates the affinity of fungi and crop plant roots to charcoal.

Charcoal placed in a fertile garden for a few months showing how crop roots (Swiss chard) and fungi are attached to this medium as habitat
Charcoal placed in a fertile garden for a few months showing how crop roots (Swiss chard) and fungi are attached to this medium as habitat
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Establishment and Management of Prairie Grasses
Royal Horticultural Society Research, UK, 2007

Establishment of North American prairie grasses by field sowing was investigated at the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Wisley. This experiment is part of a larger programme of work to investigate the use of North American prairie wildflowers and grasses as a style of planting in gardens and parks in Britain, which is a modern, informal and low maintenance. It is particularly appropriate for amenity planting.

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Potential of carbon sequestration by carbonizing wood residue from industrial tree plantation as a Clean Development Mechanism project in the Kyoto Mechanism
Okimori,Y.Takahashi,F. Ogawa,M. (KANSO),Yamanaka,T.(Kansai Electric Power), Energy with Agricultural Carbon Utilization Symposium, Georgia 2004

1. Effective sequestration of CO2 in atmosphere and its inactivation
2. Carbon sequestration project by forestation and charcoal use
3. Charcoal properties
4. Charcoal properties: porous structure

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Cornell University Biochar: Work By others
Johannes Lehmann

Bio-char: Research by our Colleagues

Groups that are very active in exploring bio-char as a soil amendment through greenhouse and field experiments (not comprehensive, please excuse any important omissions):

- Marco Rondon: Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Cali, Colombia

- Bruno Glaser: Institute of Soil Science, University of Bayreuth, Germany

- M. Ogawa: Kansai Research Institute, Japan

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT THROUGH CORNSTOVER UTILIZATION
Location: Morris, Minnesota
Project Team REICOSKY, DONALD
USDA/ARS

Project Number: 3645-11000-003-02
Project Type: Reimbursable

Start Date: Mar 30, 2006
End Date: Mar 29, 2009

Objective:
Evaluate the recycling of soil char and bio oil carbon as a byproduct of pyrolysis and determine the effect of the N enriched char byproduct on soil microbial activity measured through CO2 evolution and plant response.

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