Cation Exchange Capacity

Biochar Trial Photos
Empty Planting Trays on Rack Fine Wet Processed Charcoal Settling in Flask Bamboo Feedstock Softwood Chip Feedstock
Empty Planting Trays on Rack Fine Wet Processed Charcoal Settling in Flask Bamboo Feedstock
Processes: 
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POTENTIAL FOR PYROLYSIS CHAR TO AFFECT SOIL MOISTURE AND NUTRIENT STATUS OF A LOAMY SAND SOIL
J.W. Gaskin, Adam Speir, L.M. Morris, Lee Ogden, Keith Harris, D. Lee, and K.C Das, Proceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, held March 27

Processes: 

Soil Organic Carbon
Jan Skjemstad, CRC Greenhouse Accounting

In Summary

Soil OC is a significant source and sink of atmospheric CO2

Soil is a complex, biologically active medium

Soil OC is not one material

Changes in SOC can be measured directly or can be modelled

The C sink value of soils is limited BUT increasing and maintaining SOC has many benefits for improved productivity and soil resilience

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Characterization of Pyrolysis Char for Use as an Agricultural Soil Amendment
Keith Harris1, Julia Gaskin1, Leticia Sonon2, and K.C. Das1
1Dept. of Biol. & Ag. Eng., 2AESL, College of Ag & Env. Sci University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Introduction:
The Southeastern Coastal Plain in the United States is a major agricultural production area; however, soils are typically low in cation exchange capacity (CEC), nutrient content, and organic carbon content. For example, Tifton

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Soil Chemical Properties Influenced by Water-Washed Charcoal: Abiotic and Biotic Processes
Chih-Hsin Cheng, Johannes Lehmann and Janice Thies, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University

Introduction
improving soil properties by using charcoal residues, including organic carbon and ashes. High content
of the base ions in the ashes could lead to increase the pH and strongly affect the study results. The

Black Carbon from Rice Residues as Soil Amendment and for Carbon Sequestration
Haefele, SM, Konboon, Y, Knoblauch, C, Koyama, S, Gummert, M, Ladha, JK
Cornell University Poster Presented to International Rice Research Institute, September 14 2006

On highly weathered soils in tropical and subtropical climates, maintenance of soil organic matter is essential to sustain system productivity and avoid rapid soil degradation. But climatic conditions as well as soil characteristics favor the rapid decomposition of organic matter. However, several recent studies indicated that black carbon, the product of incomplete combustion of organic material, could combine characteristics highly beneficial for soil nutrient dynamics with high stability against chemical and microbial breakdown.

Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capacity in Soils
Liang et al. Soil Sci Soc Am J.2006; 70: 1719-1730

Authors:
B. Liang, J. Lehmann, D. Solomon, J. Kinyangi, J. Grossman, B. O'Neill, J. O. Skjemstad, J. Thies, F. J. Luiz

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