Soil Science

Arborists in Chicago are studying the results of biochar on trees growing in urban soils that are typically hostile to trees. This research is part of a larger urban-soils study that includes applications of biochar in greenhouse and field plot settings at The Morton Arboretum. The Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories have also been testing adding biochar to the soil mix when planting trees. More information and media coverage of this study about biochar and urban tree care can be found on the Bartlett Tree Experts web site.

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Biochar Interest Group, South East Asia, Dr Elmer V Sayre
January, 2011

Dr Elmer V Sayre has been working with the Ecosan project (http://scienceforhumanity.ning.com/group/ecosan ) to use Biochar blended with other organic material and Human Waste to produce fertile soil. More information can be found on their site:
http://sea-biochar.blogspot.com/2011/01/terra-preta-sanitation-project-in.html

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Introduction to Soil Science
T.S. Tollefson, University of Saskatchewan, CA SCSR Open Courseware 41/240

This course is designed for students in the Diploma in Agriculture program and first and second year students in the B.S.A. program. Graduate students in the Soil Science may also find the course useful background for their qualifying or comprehensive exams.

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Mélanie Élouise Bennet PhD Student University of East Anglia, School of Biological Sciences John Innes Centre, Dept. Molecular Mircobiology Chairman, UEA Gardening Group m.bennet@uea.ac.uk

The current challenge

The world faces a “perfect storm” of food, water and energy shortages. Food stocks are the lowest they’ve been in 50 years. John Beddington, chief scientific advisor to the UK Government, has stated that 50% more food, 50% more energy and 30% more water will be needed by 2030 to supply a growing population. Even in developed nations like Britain and Australia, rising environmental pressure on crops would drive up import prices. Higher temperatures and less water brought about by climate change is expected to make some crop growing area difficult to manage, particularly in areas which are already experiencing drier than normal conditions. However, the precise impacts of climate change are difficult to predict accurately.

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Wisconsin Procedures for Soil Testing, Plant Analysis and Feed and Forage Analysis
Editor: John Peters, Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison(Compiled December, 2006)

This document provides analytical procedures on the following:

Soil Sample Preparation
Internal Check System
Soil pH and Sikora Lime Requirement
Available Phosphorus
Available Potassium
Organic Matter
Weight Loss-on-Ignition (LOI 360o)
B, Mn, Ca/Mg, SO4-S, and NO3-N

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