USA

Lawn and garden products become more organic
Marty Hair, Detroit Free Press in Fort Wayne New Sentinel, March 28, 2007

"Sales of organic fertilizers and growing media like potting soils are expected to rise from $360 million this year to $670 million by 2011, according to the consumer research firm Packaged Facts."

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Biocarbons (Charcoal)
Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, January 2007

Consider the following riddle:

I am renewable;
I am a chemical element;
as a fuel I am often less expensive ($/GJ) than natural gas;
my energy density (GJ/m3) can exceed that of ethanol or LPG;
and my combustion does not add to the CO2 in the atmosphere;
I am easily stored and safe to transport;
I clean the water you drink and the air you breathe;
Plants grow best in soils that are enriched with me;
I am a key ingredient in the production of semiconductors;
When eaten I settle an upset stomach and clean the intestines; and
No one is afraid of me!
What am I?

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The Art, Science, and Technology of Charcoal Production
Michael Jerry Antal, Jr., Morten Gronli, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 42 (8), 1619 -1640, 2003. 10.1021/ie0207919 S0888-5885(02)00791-1 Web Release Date: March 14, 2003

Abstract:

Processes: 
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Market Feasibility for Products Developed at the Cashton Greens Energy Park
Cashton Area Development Corporation,and Stephen Joseph, BEST Energies March 15, 2006

Overall Project Introduction

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Research Project: ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT THROUGH CORNSTOVER UTILIZATION
Location: Morris, Minnesota
Project Team REICOSKY, DONALD
USDA/ARS

Project Number: 3645-11000-003-02
Project Type: Reimbursable

Start Date: Mar 30, 2006
End Date: Mar 29, 2009

Objective:
Evaluate the recycling of soil char and bio oil carbon as a byproduct of pyrolysis and determine the effect of the N enriched char byproduct on soil microbial activity measured through CO2 evolution and plant response.

Approach:

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Distributed Hydrogen Production with Profitable Carbon Sequestration: A Novel Integrated Sustainable System for Clean
Fossil Fuel Emissions and a Bridge to the New Hydrogen Economy and Global Socio-Economic Stability
Danny M. Day, Eprida, Inc., 6300 Powers Ferry, Suite 307, Atlanta, Georgia
danny.day@eprida.com, 404-228-8687
Robert J. Evans, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Co
James W. Lee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

Introduction and Abstract

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Pyrolysis Char - Land Application Study
Julia Gaskin (jgaskin@engr.uga.edu), Department Biological and Agricultural Engineering
Larry Morris (lmorris@forestry.uga.edu), Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources
University of Georgia Biorefining and Carbon Cycling Program

Overview:

Char produced from the pyrolysis of peanut hulls and pine chips was applied to soil at 5 and 10 ton per acre quantities in ordetr to study the effects on plant growth.

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Soil erosion, energy scarcity, excess greenhouse gas all answered through regenerative carbon management
Paul Hepperly, The New Farm, Rodale Institute, January 12, 2006

Compost is great, but new bio-based process yields hydrogen and super-stable carbon as charcoal soil booster.

Dr. Paul's Research Perspectives
Soil erosion, energy scarcity, excess greenhouse gas
all answered through regenerative carbon management
Compost is great, but new bio-based process yields hydrogen and super-stable carbon as charcoal soil booster.

By Paul Hepperly

editors' NOTE:

As New Farm Research and Training Manager at The Rodale Institute

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